ELEVATED RESTING HEART RATE IS A CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTOR

Elevated resting heart rate is considered as a relevant cardiovascular risk marker that affects all stages of the cardiovascular continuum. Elevated heart rate is involved in the development of atherosclerosis, myocardial ischemia, and remodeling of the heart and blood vessels. The impact of heart rate on prognosis has been proven in the general population, and in hypertensive, CAD, and heart failure patients.1


Therefore, heart rate is an independent risk factor which could be a goal of therapy to prevent cardiovascular events.


1. Custodis F, et al. J Cardiol. 2013;62:183-187.

ELEVATED RESTING HEART RATE IS A RISK FACTOR IN HEART FAILURE

In chronic heart failure, in the placebo arm of the SHIFT study, patients with higher heart rate (≥87 bpm) had a more than 2-fold higher risk for primary composite end point than patients with the lowest heart rate (70-72 bpm). Risk of primary composite end point events increased by 3% with every beat increase from baseline heart rate and 16% for every 5-bpm increase.1


Therefore, heart rate is an independent risk factor which could be a goal of therapy to prevent cardiovascular events.


1. Böhm M, et al; SHIFT Investigators. Lancet. 2010;376(9744):886-894.